You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Building Toys’ category.

I didn’t plan on going garage saling this weekend, but when one of the pit bull rescues that I follow on Facebook posted that they would have a booth at the “Biggest Garage Sale in OKC” at the state fairgrounds yesterday, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity for concentrated bargains in one place. I dragged Jason out of bed and off we went to see what treasures were waiting for us. And treasures we did find!

Image

Here’s a picture of the whole shebang; everything we bought. Trust me, we probably would have had more, but we had to peruse quickly because we were catching a movie at 2:30. It’s a sad thing not to have time to dig in the piles of junk, but we did pretty well, regardless.

First off, you’ll notice the Harry Potter sleeping bag that I got for $2. It will look fabulous used as a blanket on the futon couch in my toy/craft room! That is, if I can ever get all the craft supplies cleared off my couch! =/

Here are the books we purchased, along with the prices we paid:

Image

“Soul of the Fire,” “Temple of the Winds,” and “The Pillars of Creation,” all by Terry Goodkind. Paid: 3/$1. I actually have the first two in this series (The Sword of Truth) already. I’ve heard that the first three are good and then they start to go downhill after that, but I figured for that cheap, they’re worth a shot, and if I hate them, I can trade them off on paperbackswap.com (a site that I just heard about from a coworker).

“The Girl Who Played With Fire” by Stieg Larsson. Paid: 25 cents, I think? One of Jason’s picks.

“Timeline” by Michael Crichton. Paid: 10 cents. Another of Jason’s picks.

“A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail” by Bill Bryson. Paid: 10 cents. I’ve never heard of this book, but I’ve got a weakness for the Appalachians, and it sounded “nature-y” enough to catch my eye for ten cents.

“Deep Black” by Stephen Coonts’. Paid: 10 cents. Another of Jason’s picks.

“Where the Heart Is” by Billie Letts. Paid: 25 cents. My sister loved the movie version of this, and I’ve always had a special place in my heart for it for that reason. I can’t remember whether or not she had ever read the book (I want to say she had…), but I figured I’d buy it, read it, and put it with a variety of other books I have that remind me of my sister.

“Canning, Freezing, Storing Garden Produce” by the United States Department of Agriculture (1977). Paid: 25 cents. Can’t have enough of these kinds of books. I’m hoping to put it to use this summer, if we can get a garden to grow, now that I have a pressure canner!

The Reader’s Digest “Complete Guide to Sewing.” Paid: $1. This is a sturdy hardback filled with lots of handy pictures and information. I’m sure to use it in the future when I’m having trouble with one technique or another.

“Vegetarian Gourmet Cookery,” by Alan Hooker (teeheehee!). Paid: 25 cents. Even though I’m not a vegetarian anymore, I still prefer vegetarian food over lots of added meat (I don’t mind meat, but I tend to like it to be separate, like a steak, instead of mixed into a casserole or something), so I always pick up cheap vegetarian cookbooks when I happen onto them.

“How to Fix Damn Near Everything” by Franklynn Peterson. Paid: $1. Jason says he probably has all the information contained in this book in various other books of the same type that he owns, but he picked it up anyway, because really, you can’t have enough of these lying around. They’re just damn useful!

And lastly, “The Solar Age Resource Book: The Complete Guidebook to the Dramatic Power of Solar Energy.” Paid: 10 cents. Jason’s an alternative energy junkie, and I’m all for it. We’re hoping to convert the house we eventually own to be powered entirely by alternative energy sources.

Total paid for all 13 books: $4.40

We also picked up two DVDs for $1 each: Bedazzled (Jason’s pick) and Madagascar (mine!).

Image

At one booth I found a gallon ziploc baggie full of a rainbow of embroidery flosses (plus a few random cross stitch pieces) and snagged the whole thing for a whopping 50 cents! I having something special in mind for those flosses, if I have enough of the right colors to do it. 😉

Image

At another booth, I found an entire box of crafting patterns, plus a few other crafting oddments, and the whole box was marked $1! Hells yeah! Everything was priced individually, so I guess they tried to sell them that way at one point of another, and the leftovers got dumped into the box I bought for $1. Most of the patterns are for baby quilts and stuffed toys/dolls, and all appear to be from the 1980s, but some were never even opened! I’ll probably pick out my faves to keep and sell the remaining ones off. The oddments in the box included some old crocheted potholders, a couple of pin cushions, a baggie of little plastic letters, a box of toothpicks, and a package of seam binding. I don’t have a clue what I’m going to do with most of it (although I’m beginning to think I should just start collecting those old crocheted/knitted potholders and blanket squares that are often found in the garage sales of old women, and sew them all together into an afghan in a mish-mash of bygone days and unfinished projects). Here are pictures of the patterns:

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

That last picture includes my favorites of the box, particularly the giant panda (IT’S SO 1980S!) and the Jemima and Jasmine patterns (are those even ok to sell anymore?!?). I would have paid a buck just for those two! Most of the patterns looks to be locally produced, which I find folky and charming. With the onslaught of sites like etsy and ebay, locally produced and distributed patterns are becoming a thing of the past!

Image

But I guess our favorite purchase of the day was this box of K’Nex (and a random Hoberman Sphere, and since Jason loves those things, that was just icing on the cake!) for $10. Don’t get me wrong, we’re still hardcore Lego people, but building toys are just fun (unless they’re MegaBloks, MegaBloks suck.). This appears to be at least part of a roller coaster set, and has at least three working motors in the box (Jason hasn’t sifted through it entirely yet). Jason has told me that he likes the K’Nex roller coaster sets before, so he was thrilled, and has pretty much claimed it as his own. Who knows where he’s going to put the thing.

So total, everything cost just under $20 ($19.90). There was an elliptical exercise machine there for $25 bucks that I totally would have snagged (I’ve been wanting one!), but it was an older model and pretty dang big, and we wouldn’t have had a way to get it home (or a place to put it once we did!). There’s no telling what else we would have brought home if we had had the time to browse. By the time we got there, sellers were already marking things down to move them out! Oh, and did I mention that most (if not all) of the booths were charity booths? We saw booths for animal rescues for golden retrievers, pomeranians, and pit bulls (the rescue I follow on Facebook), as well as boy scout troops, church mission trips, and more! It was a pretty nifty event!

Not a bad haul for an impromptu garage saling trip, don’tcha think?

Advertisements